Press Releases

Press Releases

The future of recreational fishing in the Gulf of Mexico is for sale in Texas.


While charter boats and private recreational anglers in the Gulf were only allowed to catch red snapper in federal waters on 10 days last year, two companies in Galveston, Texas have been taking recreational anglers red snapper fishing all year round.


What's more, the companies allow the fishermen to keep as many red snapper as they want each day, blowing past the two-fish-per-day federal limit.


The only thing limiting how many snapper the customers are allowed to keep is how much they are willing to pay.


The Texas companies have been getting around the federal limits and seasons by selling the "Catch Shares Fishing Experience." The Texas companies involved own "catch shares" of the commercial red snapper fishery that allow them to harvest a set number of pounds per year for commercial sale.


Instead of catching those fish with a professional crew and selling them to a fish house, the captains are taking recreational anglers fishing and letting them buy the fish afterward.


For the customers, the catch share experience represents the ultimate fishing trip, where they can keep many more snapper than the two per person per day allowed under federal law. Meanwhile, the boat captains running the trips are able to market the fish as "fresh fish caught that day," which command a much higher price at the dock than most commercially caught snapper.

For the rest of this story, please visit https://www.al.com/news/index.ssf/2016/04/post_111.html.

Sportfishing is big business in Florida. More than 3 million people fish for fun here every year, and one out of every three of those anglers comes from out-of-state or out-of-country. Florida anglers support more than 80,000 jobs and generate $8.6 billion in economic activity, while boating industry generates another $2.3 billion in retail sales and directly employs another 40,000 people.

Anglers also make major contributions toward managing our natural resources. We are often the first to identify habitat and water quality issues, and it is our dollars that fund critical conservation efforts through excise taxes on fishing equipment and motorboat fuel. In Florida alone, anglers contribute nearly $40 million a year toward conservation and restoration efforts.

Read more: Sportfishing is big business in Florida

Our Florida Reefs
c/o Francisco Pagan, Ph.D
Manager, FDEP Coral Reef Conservation Program
Florida Coastal Office
1277 NE 79th Street/JFK Causeway
Miami, FL 33138-4206


Dear Mr. Pagan:


Coastal Conservation Association (CCA) supports healthy fisheries and habitat, including our coral reefs. When appropriate, CCA has supported a number of spawning season area closures in the South Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. CCA has an active habitat restoration and artificial reefs placement program. CCA's mission is focused on scientific approaches to sound fisheries management for present and future generations to enjoy the resource. Within these parameters, CCA supports angler access.


First, Recommended Management Action (RMA) N-146 proposes up to 24 marine protected areas (MPAs) that in some cases will ban fishing over 20% to 30% of the reef tract from the northern boundary of Martin County to the southern boundary of Dade County. CCA does not support the establishment of MPAs unless, they are scientifically based, have stated goals and that MPAs are the last resort. CCA does not support using MPAs as a first stage management tool. While CCA is opposed to implementing no take/no fishing zones or Sanctuaries, CCA would ask that fisheries managers consider protecting spawning aggregations by limited time and area closures if warranted by stock assessments and good fisheries management practices.

Read more: CCA Florida Open Letter to OFR

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